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Luiz
''Many'' 1) ''Many is the child who has been warned against strangers''. 2) ''Many a scientist has tried to find a cure for the disease, but only a few have succeeded''. 3) ''Many another day will come when we shall be judged''. Are the sentences above correct? Do the idioms ''many a/an...'', ''many is the...'' and ''many another...'' have the same meaning? Is this usage considered to be formal? Thanks in advance.
Sep 16, 2018 2:09 AM
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Answers · 5
Hi Luiz, 1) ''Many is the child who has been warned against strangers''. (correct) 2) ''Many a scientist has tried to find a cure for the disease, but only a few have succeeded''. (correct) 3) ''Many another day will come when we shall be judged''. (correct) Such expressions are used in formal and literary writing. (i) "Many a/an/another + singular noun + singular verb..." express the same meaning as "many" (a large quantity of something). (ii) "Many is (the + singular noun)" talks about something that occurs frequently. Examples: Many is the trip I had to make to ask for her hand in marriage. Such were the philanthropic acts which brought shame to many a pharisee. I hope this helps.
September 17, 2018
Hi Luiz, here are my corrections: 1. Many a child has been warned about strangers. 2. No corrections, this one is correct. 3. Many a day will come when we shall be judged. I've heard "many a/an" much more than "many is the" (which seems like it should be "many are the" since many is plural) and I have never, ever heard "many another" and doubt it is actually in usage at all, if it ever was. So I will speak about "many a/an"; it is an older idiom so to use it now sounds a bit formal or stylized, like the beginning of a proverb. Hope that helps.
September 16, 2018
Wow, not many taking on this latest question of yours. :) . 1) ''Many is the child who has been warned against strangers''. I'd have to say "many are the children who have ... sounds better to me. 2) ''Many a scientist has tried to find a cure for the disease, but only a few have succeeded''. Ok 3) ''Many another day will come when we shall be judged''. Does this mean many days? Does it mean many (people), another day, will come ... (1) seems to be equivalent to There are many children who have .. or many a child has ... which seem the same as (2) The last one simply confuses me, sorry. Many a person views this thorny questions and trys another instead :) Many are they who run from this one.
September 16, 2018
Luiz
Language Skills
English, Portuguese
Learning Language
English