Maggie
questions Moving warily, he scrambled back down the slope of the roof on his hands and knees past the line of demarcation where the fresh green Bird shingles gave way to the section of roof he had just finished clearing. He came to the edge on the left of the wasps' nest he had uncovered and moved gingerly toward it, ready to backtrack and bolt down his ladder to the ground if things looked too hot. Question 1: What’s the meaning of ‘past the line of demarcation where the fresh green Bird shingles gave way to the section of roof he had just finished clearing?’ Question 2: What’s the meaning of ‘things looked too hot?’
Sep 18, 2018 2:03 PM
Answers · 4
In the context of the paragraph, he is about to be faced with a nest of wasps - stinging wasps! If "things get too hot" means if things get out of control with wild and angry wasps after him, then matters will have become "hot." He is prepared to get out of there if this happens. In English there's a saying: "too hot to handle." With this idiom, "hot" is a condition (dangerous or difficult) and not actual heat such as a stove or fire.
September 18, 2018
The "line of demarcation" is the boundary or dividing line where there is a noticeable difference. In your example, the boundary would be between the newly laid roof shingles and the part of the roof were the old shingles had been removed. As for the expression, "looked too hot" this could mean "dangerous". The character could think conditions on the roof were risky because of the wasps or some other factors. Hope this helps
September 18, 2018
Still haven’t found your answers?
Write down your questions and let the native speakers help you!