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Terry
Are these natural? Don't be wise after the event! Don't make a fuss after the event! Don't fuss around after the event! Don't beat a dead horse! Thanks for the history lessons! That's old news! Are the above six expressions familiar with you guys, English speakers? And they are conveying the same meaning?
Oct 4, 2018 1:31 PM
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Answers · 4
Hi Terry, The first three aren't common phrases or expressions but the last three are. The only change to the second to last should be "Thanks for the history lesson." (Lesson isn't plural in the most commonly used expression.) Don't beat a dead horse! (Meaning: Don't keep talking or thinking about something that is finished or been talked about and agreed on.) Thanks for the history lesson! (Meaning: Usually said sarcastically and is used when someone gives unwanted answers or descriptions/stories about things in the past.) That's old news! (Meaning: I heard or knew about that for a while now.) Hope this helps! :)
October 4, 2018
Ooh! Great question! I love idioms! Don't be wise after the event! <- this is not a phrase Don't make a fuss after the event! <- also no, sorry Don't fuss around after the event! <- nope, sorry! Don't beat a dead horse! <- stop talking about it! Although usually we use it when we want to apologise for continuing to talk about something. Especially in Britain. "I don't mean to beat a dead horse, but I still don't understand what happened, could you explain it again?" - Thanks for the history lessons! <- Ooh I love this phrase! It's very rude though. Probably said by a teenager or someone who is passive aggressive. If my brother is telling me all the mistakes I've made I might snap and say "Thanks for the history lesson!" but what I mean is "SHUT UP!" - That's old news! <- I already knew this. For example: Friend 1: Did you hear that Jack broke up with Clara? Friend 2: That's old news! They posted it on Facebook three days ago! But have you heard who Clara is going to ask out? I hope this helps, I completely agree with what Summer's said and it's always good to get more examples! Best wishes, Katherine
October 4, 2018
Terry
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English