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mayi
Question about "gotta" there is a subtitle: "There's gotta be something wrong with him" which comes from the first episode of first season of "Friends". I just heard of "there is going to(gonna) be..." before. so what does "there's gotta be..."mean? thank you for your help.
Oct 10, 2018 7:35 AM
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Answers · 9
In your example, “gotta” represents the usual pronunciation of “got to” (as in has / have got to, meaning has / have to). Note that like many words in English, there is a difference between the pronunciation and the correct spelling — “gotta” is not the correct spelling, but simply a way of representing the pronunciation. (It’s actually rather silly, since that is in fact the usual pronunciation — it's not slang.) There's nothing unusual about contracting an auxiliary verb in English; what's unusual is that the contraction "gotta" is not an acceptable spelling (and is used only to represent normal speech). Note that the phrase “got a” can also be pronounced “gotta” (again, the correct spelling is “got a”). For example: He’s gotta new car = he’s got a new car.
October 10, 2018
There has got to be, There's got to be, There's gotta be.
October 10, 2018
Gotta means Got to. It is a slang term to speed up conversation it is easier to say Gotta than stop and say two words also it is a sound or musical element of language. It sounds relaxed.
October 10, 2018
gotta=got to going to(gonna)i think this one is better.
October 10, 2018
@Sierra, thank you so much:)
October 10, 2018
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mayi
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English