StevenBY
I have a soft spot for somebody/something Hi there 1. I know basically it's another colorful way of saying "I love somebody/something", but are there any slight differences in meaning between them? 2. This also reminds me of another expression "be a sucker for", how would this be any different from/than the other two? I love her personality I have soft spot for her personality I'm a sucker for her personality Do you see a difference? Let me know! Thanks in advance
Oct 24, 2018 11:39 PM
Answers · 9
These two phrases can be used interchangeably. However, there's a slight difference in the emphasis of the two. When we say we have a 'soft spot' we are usually talking about matters of the heart. I have a soft spot for homeless puppies and kittens. I have a soft spot for romantic music. I have a soft spot for the elderly. In contrast, when someone 'is a sucker' for something, it can be seen more as a character flaw -- like the person's feelings make him foolhardy or a target for people to take advantage of. I'm a sucker for every beggar on the street. I'm a sucker for a guy with a clever line and a bouquet of flowers. I'm a sucker for a big sale at the mall.
October 24, 2018
Maybe this is splitting hairs, but I would say that "love" is a little stronger than "having a soft spot for." In any case, to have a soft spot for somebody/something means you like him/it a lot. Essentially, those three sentences mean the same thing. The expressions "have a soft spot for" and "to be a sucker for" are not super common in everyday speech. They are sometimes used, but I don't remember the last time I heard someone say either of them.
October 24, 2018
These phrases are similar but they have slightly different meanings. It’s hard to explain because it depends on the situation, but here are some examples: “I have a soft spot for her personality” sounds strange. Usually people use “soft spot” for something more general or for cute things, like “I have a soft spot for puppies” or “I have a soft spot for girls with brown eyes”. Normally you don’t use it for something specific, and just means you really like or prefer certain types of things (usually types of people or types of animal). You can say “I love all dogs but I have a soft spot for dogs with floppy ears” but you would NOT say “I have a soft spot for this dog’s floppy ears”. To be a sucker for something means you can’t resist. You can say “I’m a sucker for expensive jewelry”. This doesn’t just mean you LOVE expensive jewelry. It means when you see expensive jewelry, it’s hard for you to RESIST buying it. “I’m a sucker for chocolate” means it’s hard for me to resist buying/eating chocolate. It almost is like the object has power over your actions because you enjoy it so much. Hopefully my explanation makes sense to you, I wrote it quickly haha. Maybe this will help you see the slight difference between “love”, “sucker for” and “soft spot”.
October 25, 2018
Hey, great question Steve. This is why I love language so much, because there are so many different ways to say how you feel. It's easy to be specific when you know a language. So, onto your questions. 1. I love somebody/something - love is subjective anyway, but in general when you say you love someone it would mean more than if you just have a 'soft spot'. You can still 'be a sucker' for someone if you love them too. 2. I have a soft spot for her personality/for her - it's a gentle way to say you admire someone. They have caught your attention, you possibly care about them. 3. I am a sucker for her personality/for her - Like what Jan said when you're a sucker for something you could be easily walked over. You would probably do anything for them because of how you feel about them.
October 25, 2018
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StevenBY
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, Spanish
Learning Language
English, Spanish