Niwantha
"to be rain" OR "to be raining" - Which is correct in this context? Hi friends, Which is the correct sentence and WHY? ("to be rain" OR "to be raining" ) 1. There is likely to be rain everywhere today except in London. 2. There is likely to be raining everywhere today except in London. Thanks in advance! Niwantha
Oct 28, 2018 5:06 AM
Answers · 5
Sentence number 1 is correct because "likely to be" is being used like a prepositional phrase here. You can take it out and make a sentence that is still correct. There is (likely to be) rain. There is (likely to be) sun. In sentence number 2, if you take out the phrase "likely to be" the sentence is no longer correct. There is (likely to be) raining. .....X!.... This is incorrect. "There is raining?" No. We would not use a gerund here. Just the noun. To make sentence number 2 correct change "There" to "It" : "It is likely to be raining everywhere today except London" Now you can take out the phrase and the sentence is correct. It is (likely to be) raining.
October 28, 2018
This is an easy question: there is.... (+ noun) So, 'there is... rain.' (P.S. No, a 'gerund' (..ing form) is not the same as a noun) :)
October 28, 2018
Rain is a noun when used in the sentence "There is likely to be rain everywhere today except London."
October 28, 2018
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Niwantha
Language Skills
English, Sinhala
Learning Language
English