Edi Wang
What does "by name" means here? According to a surgeon at a specialized hospital, Dawit Teare, by name said the patient suffers from mental illness and had obviously consumed the objects. I don't understand "by name" here means what, and what it's function is. Please could someone help me?
Nov 6, 2018 12:55 AM
Answers · 4
Hi, Edi! Reading Chris' answer it sounds like every English speaker you know is trying to turn you into a Cowboy! Chris wouldn't know that I have been sharing Cowboy lingo with you as well. Now about that training to be a doctor stuff, Edi. You already have a family and you already have an arduous profession so I doubt that you want to add another 6 to 10 years of additional training, but I think between Chris and I we could "larn you a mite bit of Cowboy lingo". Cowpoke is another slang word for cowboy. Wrangler is even another one since cowpokes might have to wrangle the steers. http://www.journalgazette.net/news/local/indiana/20180311/cowboys-help-wrangle-stubborn-steers Back to the subject at hand, Edi, "Dawit Teare, by name..." Yup, pardner, you would find that phraseology in Cowboy novels but it could also creep up in other writings as well. Science fiction is another example. I don't know how rare is the usage but Chris is right about it not being common speech today amongst native English speakers. I don't believe I would lump it as "Rare as Hens teeth", a phrase you might also see in Western (Cowboy) Novels. Funny how the term "Western Novel" has a connotation of "the Old West", days of Cowboys and Indians, etc. Western Dress, Wild West Show.. both refer to a more rural picture of life in the Western United States generally in days gone past, however that life style is still alive and active in parts of the U.S. I live in a city that prides itself on the Biggest Little Round Up in the West, the Reno Rodeo Cattle Drive. The author of the sentence you listed, Edi, may also have just wanted to use a different style of writing in order to distinguish his sentence in style from the ordinary phrase the reader might expect... sort of a "literary license" sort of thing... doing something in a different way just to be different and catch the attention of the reader at the same time! Best regards, Tex. Bill
November 6, 2018
The original sentence wasn't written by a native. You should erase both "by name" and "said": "According to a surgeon at a specialized hospital, Dawit Teare, the patient suffers from mental illness and had obviously consumed the objects." OR "According to a surgeon named Dawit Teare at a specialized hospital, the patient suffers from mental illness and had obviously consumed the objects." OR "Dawit Teare, a surgeon at a specialized hospital, said the patient suffers from mental illness and had obviously consumed the objects." It sounds like you are training to be a doctor. "By name" is a fairly rare dialect/spoken structure that mostly occurs in cowboy novels. You won't need to use it as a doctor. "A man stood against the setting sun. John McHenry by name and cowpoke by profession, he was the meanest old cuss I ever had seen in these here parts."
November 6, 2018
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Edi Wang
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English