Şervan Kurdî
schlepping into! Today, everybody else can make $40,000 to a million, so long as they can nail the correct combination of their medium and passion. In most of the country, earning mid-five figures means you’re living pretty well, often exactly as well as you would were you schlepping into someone else’s office every day. Now though, you’re earning the same money talking about something you are crazy about. It’s a good deal. Take it. Would you please simplify this part: "often exactly as well as you would were you schlepping into someone else’s office every day" What does "mid-five figure" mean? (show it in numbers) Thanks a lot in advance
Nov 8, 2018 10:02 AM
Answers · 5
Hi Servan, "To Schlep" is a Yiddish word, meaning "to drag". It has really morphed into slang for 'going reluctantly or believing the movement isn't worth it. When I was a kid, my older brother would say "I'm not schlepping all the way to XYZ to pick you up. Get your own ride home". Or "that's a long schlep just for a XXX". Olivia is spot on regarding "mid 5 figures" 40,000 - 60,000. Have a great day, Stephen
November 8, 2018
Hello Servan! I'll answer your last question first. Five figures means any number between 10,000 and 99,000. So, mid-five figures is any number in the middle of this range, or roughly $50,000. And "often exactly as well as you would were you schlepping into someone else’s office every day" could be simplified to, "about the same amount of money as you would earn going to your boss's office every day". (Schlepping is a slang, Yiddish word for walking or going to someplace.) So this sentence means: When you work for someone else in an office, you probably make around $50,000. Hope that helps!
November 8, 2018
Five figures starts at 10,000 and ends at 99,999, so mid 5 figures is taken to mean around 50,000. But it is not strictly 50,000. For instance 45,000 or 55,000 are considered mid 5 figures as well. 'Schlepping' is not standard English. By that, I mean it is argot or maybe an adopted word used by only a narrow group of speakers/writers. I've never heard of it before and I am a native speaker ! I did a little research on it, and in this instance it means colloquially "dragging yourself" to work, or in more standard English going to work reluctantly because you have to.
November 8, 2018
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Şervan Kurdî
Language Skills
English, Korean, Kurdish, Persian (Farsi)
Learning Language
Korean