Luiz
Expressions in Poetry ''The maples stamped against the west Were black and stately and full of rest, And the hazy orange moon grew up And slowly changed to yellow gold While the hills were darkened, fold on fold To a deeper blue than a flower could hold.'' The stanza above was extracted from ''August Moonrise'', a poem written by Sara Teasdale. I have got two questions on the verse concerned: 1) What does the expression ''stamped against'' mean in that sort of context? 2) What does the author mean by saying ''fold on fold''? Thank you very much.
Jun 13, 2019 10:12 PM
Answers · 9
I believe "stamped against," in this context, refers to the use of a stamp made with ink. The passage seems to be describing sunset, and at sunset, trees (and other objects) with the sun behind them will appear to be a solid black color, with no visible details. This is exactly the kind of image a rubber stamp produces, when you roll or dip it in ink and then apply it to paper: it produces a kind of silhouette or flat impression of the object, solid black, with no details. The poet describes how the trees in the west (where the sun sets) look like flat shapes, as if they had been "stamped" against the colored background of the sky.
June 13, 2019
I took this picture from Kitt Peak, Arizona. I think it shows a landscape that might be described as "fold on fold." You can see several ranges of mountains, each further away, each a little bluer than the range in front. https://imgur.com/orl8Y6W.jpg
June 14, 2019
Fold on fold refers to the rolling tops of the hills, as if viewed from a distance, the hills look like folds in the landscape. The specific phrase "fold on fold" is a variant of "folds upon folds", which is intended to convey how numerous these hills are. There are folds upon folds upon folds, in the same way you could say a warehouse is full of boxes upon boxes upon boxes- rather than on/upon literally meaning "to be placed on the top of something," they are used to signify quantity. Hope that helps!
June 13, 2019
Fold on fold refers to the rolling tops of the hills, as if viewed from a distance, the hills look like folds in the landscape. The specific phrase "fold on fold" is a variant of "folds upon folds", which is intended to convey how numerous these hills are. There are folds upon folds upon folds, in the same way you could say a warehouse is full of boxes upon boxes upon boxes- rather than on/upon literally meaning "to be placed on the top of something," they are used to signify quantity. Hope that helps!
June 13, 2019
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