Xiaoxiong
I fail to understand a sentence in a book, could anyone explain it for me? I can't understand a sentence in The Grit in the Pearl. Could anyone help me to figure its meaning out? It was typed down with several previous sentences as follows: "In Margaret's later years she recalled, 'Helen was extremely good at running the house and the servants adored her. But she was tough with them, much tougher than I've ever been.' It conjurers up a dual life: the kindness of strangers and Margaret's readiness to accept love and adoration from those who were not family. It was a dynamic she learned in the nursery; the foundation of what others referred to as a false facade of vulnerability." The last sentence is very confusing to me. The words located after the semicolon does not look like a clause, since there is no verb in them. According to the content of prior sentences, I try to interpret it as "It was a dynamic she learned in the nursery; (it was) the foundation of what others referred (love and adoration) to as a false facade of vulnerability." Simply saying, in nursery, Margaret've got the conclusion from how her mother treated servants and their reaction to her that the foundation of what people's love or adoration traced to was a false facade of vulnerability. I don't know if I comprehend it correctly. I'd really appreciate someone who told me the right meaning of it.
Jun 26, 2019 10:07 PM
Answers · 4
I can see why you find that a little confusing. It's a very subtle message and I would probably have to read more of the book to understand what the author is trying to say, but from what you've written I believe this is the meaning... Margaret, as an adult, had a readiness to accept love and adoration from those who were not her family. The author is implying that this is a little bit strange and improper. Normally people aren't very willing to accept love and adoration until they really know one another for a very long time, because it takes a very long time before you can trust someone with your love. So why is Margaret so willing to do this? The author says it is something she learned in the nursery at a very young age. It sounds like Margaret was raised by servants and not by her mother. She learned to accept WHAT SHE THOUGHT was love and adoration from people who were just employees. So there was something a little bit wrong and unnatural about that. Perhaps Margaret realizes this somewhere in her subconscious. She should have received love from her family and not servants. But that was how it was, so this sort of dynamic became part of her foundation and personality. Margaret, as an adult, had a false facade of vulnerability, she ACTED like she accepted love from people but she actually didn't, because she was never shown what real love was when she was a child. In fact, Margaret probably had no idea what love was. To her, love was something you accepted from people who were paid to be there.
June 27, 2019
Still haven’t found your answers?
Write down your questions and let the native speakers help you!