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The meaning of "green" when it is related to an unexperienced and/or naive person. Does it not imply that the person is supposed to be young as well? Could I say "green" about anyone who doesn't have much experience but not so young (middle-aged, for instance)? *I'd be happy to get answers from native English speakers
Jul 31, 2019 3:50 AM
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I don't think green necessarily implies someone is young, usually just inexperienced. However, you're correct, you don't hear it used with older people as often. Perhaps it's just because people who are older typically naturally have more experience. If you called a middle-aged person who was inexperienced, "green", it would make sense and I wouldn't question you.
July 31, 2019
Somewhat disagree with the other answers because this use of "green" presumably comes from the plant world, and relates to a lack of time to develop/ripen. I wouldn't use "green" this way for any age, though, as it's vague and ambiguous. I'd be more likely to use "greenhorn"
July 31, 2019
Being "green" has nothing to do with age. It's just about time/experience in the specific topic, as Alan says.
July 31, 2019
Thank you very much, Alan!
July 31, 2019
As a native english speaker I've never thought of "green" as having anything to do with age. Rather amount of time/experience in the specific topic.
July 31, 2019
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Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English