cyanstar
What does it mean "I failed with you"? Context is as below. I(=father) failed with you(=son). Fathers are meant to teach their sons about life, but you were an disappointment. Does it mean the son disappointed his father? Or, the father failed in teaching his son about life?
Aug 5, 2019 6:24 PM
Answers · 5
Thank you for your question. First, a gentle reminder, “an” is used before a vowel. You would use “a” not “an” before disappointment. The answer to your question would depend on the speaker. If the father was the speaker (or writer in an email or letter, for example), he would be saying that he tried to teach his son. The father believes that fathers are supposed to do so but his son turned out to be a disappointment. If the son were the speaker (or writer), the reverse would be true, it would be his father who failed him. I think you meant to say “failed you.” Not “failed with you.” Failed with you would have an entirely different meaning. It would mean that both parties failed together.
August 5, 2019
The father is disappointed by his son and is disappointed in himself for not teaching his son better. (It's a form of accepting part of the blame)
August 5, 2019
didn't succeed or not successful.
August 5, 2019
The "with" refers to comparison with others. With the first two children, I did ok, but for some reason I failed with you.
August 5, 2019
Failed somebody means let somebody down. the father failed to teaching his son about life
August 5, 2019
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