ali sirous
Role of reminiscent Hi everyone! what's the role of reminiscent in the following sentence? a style strongly reminiscent of Virginia Woolf’s novels If it's adj why is it used after the style which is a noun and without any linking verb or to be verbs? Thank you very much in advance for your attention
Aug 10, 2019 1:29 PM
Answers · 3
What you have written is a noun phrase with a relative clause. (Since it's not a complete sentence, it doesn't have a main verb.) The complete sentence could have been something like this: "This book is written in a style strongly reminiscent of Virginia Woolf’s novels." The noun phrase in your question consists of the noun 'style' modified by the relative clause '[that is] strongly reminiscent of Virginia Woolf's novels'. The linking phrase 'that is' has been omitted for stylistic purposes, but is understood. So the meaning of the complete sentence would be: "This book is written in a style [that is] strongly reminiscent of Virginia Woolf’s novels." Here are some similar examples, in complete sentences: She uses language [that is] absolutely typical of American teenagers. Beside the road there was a ditch [that was] both deep and wide. He made his fortune selling products [that were] neither useful nor attractive. They have published a document [that is] utterly devoid of meaning.
August 10, 2019
"reminiscent of" means "reminds you of something" So we have the style strongly reminds one of Virginia Woolf’s novels You can also put reminiscent before the noun if you leave out "of" A reminiscent feeling - a feeling that reminds you something in the past. (probably pleasant )
August 10, 2019
It's a predicative adjective ( rather than an attributive one) and it's part of the reduced relative clause following the noun - a shortened form of 'a style which is strongly reminiscent of Virginia Woolf's novels'.
August 10, 2019
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