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Elena Babu
He wanted me; he led me - STRUCTURE Hi! Help me, please. What is a structure of sentences? He wants me to cook a dinner. Is that right? Can I say it in an other way? He walked me across the city centre and showed nice places. It's weird for me to use "me", I'm afraid of wrong sense of sentence. Thanks!
Aug 14, 2019 10:16 AM
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He wants me to cook a dinner. [OK - very natural] He walked WITH me across the city centre and showed places TO ME. He walked WITH me across the city centre and showed ME nice places. He and I walked across the city centre and he showed ME nice places. Here is more information: He wanted to cook dinner. [= He wanted that he cook dinner.] He wanted me to cook dinner. [= He wanted that I cook dinner.] He gave flowers to his mother. He gave his mother flowers. He showed nice places to me. He showed me nice places. He walked the dog at the park. [= He took the dog for a walk at the park.] He walked me across the city centre .... [unnatural because people are not dogs.] He walked WITH me across the city centre .... [natural] He AND I walked across the city centre .... [natural]
August 14, 2019
Hi Elena As Kenny has said in his comment (above), it's very common to use 'me' in this way. In fact, Kenny has also used 'me' after 'showed' in his corrected version of your second sentence. The way you have used 'me' in this structure is perfectly correct. With verbs of action, like 'walk', 'show' and 'ask' we normally use the past form as you have done in your second example. However, with stative verbs, such as 'want' we do use the present tense because those states or conditions continue over a period of time. So the structure is: Noun/pronoun + bare infinitive or past form if verb of action + noun/pronoun + infinitive The suggestion that you say "He asks me to cook a dinner" is a grammatically correct option in English, but would be unusual and only occurs in some forms of story-writing. We can use the present tense to express a habit and for example say "He asks me to cook dinner" + "every week/twice a year/often/rarely/etc" - but note that this sentence doesn't include the article "a" because there is more than one dinner.
August 14, 2019
Hi Elena, 1) you could say: "He asks me to cook a dinner". 2) the second sentence is correct
August 14, 2019
He walked me across the city centre and showed me nice places. He walked with me across the city centre and showed me nice places. Both of these are grammatically ok but they have different meanings. The second would be a much more common thing to hear. I walk my dog every morning. (This would be a typical use of “walk” this way. I am in control. I am leading my dog.) I walk my children to school. (Also fine. I am responsible.) I live in a dangerous neighborhood and I was thankful that my brother walked me home. (Your brother is taking care of you. He is protecting you.) I walk my wife every morning. (This would be very rare. Perhaps if she had had a stroke and could only move with my assistance. Otherwise you would say I walk with my wife every morning. Your example suggests that you are in a very subordinate position. He is taking care of you. A more natural way to say this might be He showed me some nice places in the city centre. We walked to some nice places in the city centre. We went for a walk and he showed me some nice places in the city centre. “He wants me to cook a dinner” is grammatically perfect but rather odd without context. Instead of taking me to a restaurant, my date wants me to cook dinner. Usually I make all the breakfasts and my wife makes all the dinners. But she told me she me wants me to cook a dinner for a change.
August 14, 2019
Thanks!
August 15, 2019
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Elena Babu
Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English