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Şervan Kurdî
Ins and Outs of place I asked this question a few days ago but with insufficient context. What does the author mean by Ins and Outs of place? The author is comparing Kurdistan with other parts of the world in terms of Ins and Outs of place and he says there is no difference. Why had he capitalized Ins and Outs? Below is the whole paragraph: In the course of my stay at Sonje Bulagh, I saw the Khan in the state of his audience-hall surrounded by his turbaned clan, dealing out law, if not justice, to those who came for it, and served with a state which princes only assume. I visited and was visited by Moussa Khan his uncle, the ex-governor, and became convinced that in Kurdistan, as elsewhere, there is a vast deal of difference between the Ins and Outs of place. Twice, in particular, we had grand mujelises, or assemblies of the tribe, at my lodgings, and very mortifying it was to me that I did not understand the conversation which was carried on entirely in Kurdish. I could sometimes just trace the subjects, for there is much Persian in Kurdish, but it was only enough to tantalize without satisfying or instructing me. Thanks a lot in advance
Aug 15, 2019 12:54 PM
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Answers · 8
Okay, so first I want to note that the book you are reading was written a long time ago. Spelling and typographical conventions have changed quite a lot since then, and even the way we capitalize words, our use of commas, and our phrasing and spelling might be different. So the exact phrase "between the Ins and Outs of place" sounds strange to a contemporary English ear. That said, we use the phrase "ins and outs" to refer to the nuances of a thing[1]. In the context you quote he is describing how different the places are in the area. It reads to me as though he's specifically referring to the way the language was spoken. He points out that "there is much Persian in Kurdish, but it was only enough to tantalize without satisfying or instructing me" implying that, while the languages are similar, they weren't similar enough for him to fully understand, so he wound up wishing he could get a better grasp of the culture, of what they were saying. You say that he concluded there was no difference, but that's not what I see. Perhaps that's in another paragraph. I see "I visited and was visited by Moussa Khan his uncle, the ex-governor, and became convinced that in Kurdistan, as elsewhere, *there is a vast deal of difference* between the Ins and Outs of place" which definitely says there is a lot of difference. [1]: https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/ins+and+outs
August 15, 2019
Şervan Kurdî
Language Skills
English, Korean, Kurdish, Persian (Farsi)
Learning Language
Korean