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Olenka
Is "whatsoever" often used by Americans?
Aug 19, 2019 4:43 PM
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Answers · 5
It’s used for emphasis, probably more among older people, especially as “no chance whatsoever” She has no chance whatsoever of getting into Harvard. There is no chance whatsoever of making the Champions League this year.
August 19, 2019
I think so. When I want to answer questions like this, I like to do a search on Google News because it turns up a good selection of contemporary examples; not formal or "literary," but not too slangy. And I find: "Doug Gottlieb Says NCAA's New 'Rich Paul Rule' is Not Racist Whatsoever." "Adam Goodes has ‘no interest whatsoever’ in reconnecting with the AFL" "Navarro would not go even that far, saying Sunday 'there's no evidence whatsoever that Americans consumers are bearing any of this.'" An election strategist was quoted as saying that a certain candidate showed "no heart whatsoever." In all of these cases, it is a quotation of spoken speech. Two are in the context of athletics, two in the context of national politics. All of them match DavidK's examples of usage.
August 19, 2019
Here is a Google Ngram for "whatsoever." The frequency is increasing slowly. https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=whatsoever&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=16&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cwhatsoever%3B%2Cc0
August 19, 2019
I doubt it's used much by anyone now. It's an archaic word not much in contemporary use. Whatever is used instead, except in the specific context as explained by David.
August 19, 2019
I wouldn’t hear it on a daily basis but another word you can use instead is “at all”. An example of this is “I have no doubt whatsoever” “I have no doubt at all”.
August 19, 2019
Olenka
Language Skills
Belarusian, English, German, Russian, Ukrainian
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English