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Владимир
who can be called "a fair person" on a bus in Russia? Hi English natives. I hope you're all fine. I'm working on this 'language situation' - an American vlogging girl Lisa is visiting Saint Petersburg, Russia with her husband. They took a local bus, and then she said, "So, we got on, and then we're like, 'Well, how do you pay your bus driver?' Cuz, there was, like, a window, and you couldn't pay it. And then, they had, like, A FAIR PERSON that was coming around. So, we showed her on our phone, 'Hey, we're trying to get to here'. ... " So, who can be called "a fair person" on a bus in Russia? Thank you in advance. PS - I could spot/hear this adjective wrong, honestly - I use the Mirriam Webster dict., where this adjective has several meanings. What 'number' could it be there? http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/fair
Aug 23, 2019 11:35 AM
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Answers · 2
They mean 'fare' person - so in the UK you'd say 'conductor' or a 'guard' or 'ticket person'. проводник I think?
August 23, 2019
Владимир
Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English