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Jordi Jorge
Remind about vs Remind of I would like to know which phrasal verb is the correct one to be used when talking about an appointment. I have heard some say "remind about" is the correct one because it talks about something in the future that I have to do. And also, I have heard others say "remind of" is the correct one because it's the one to be used for something already set such as an appointment. So, what do you think? Which one should I use in this case? Here are a few example sentences: 1. The alarm reminded Tim of his appointment. 2. The alarm reminded Tim about his appointment. 3. Thank you for reminding me of my doctor's appointment tomorrow—I had completely forgotten! 4. Thank you for reminding me about my doctor's appointment tomorrow—I had completely forgotten!
Aug 30, 2019 8:29 PM
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Answers · 3
It is more correct, and in my opinion more natural, to use "remind about." "Remind me about X" means "help me not to forget X." Thus, your examples #2 and #4 are better. #1 and #3 are OK, though. Usually, "reminds me of X" means "makes me think of something similar to X." For example, "Her face reminds me of Jennifer Aniston's." In a once-famous commercial, natural-foods guru Euell Gibbons said that the taste of a certain brand of breakfast cereal "reminds me of the taste of wild hickory nuts." He didn't mean "I need to do something so that I don't forget the wild hickory nuts." He meant "the taste of the cereal suddenly brought to mind the taste of wild hickory nuts."
August 31, 2019
Hi! "Remind somebody about something": to make someone remember something that they must do. "Remind somebody of something": to make someone remember someone that they know or something that happened in the past.
August 30, 2019
I’m not sure what your goal is with English, but in conversational English both of these are acceptable. The “about” use feels a tiny bit more smooth to me, but I use both. I’d probably say “of” if I was too lazy to say about. In formal writing, I’d use “about” instead.
August 30, 2019
Jordi Jorge
Language Skills
English, Italian, Spanish
Learning Language
English