Community Web Version Now Available
Mehrdad
The boy does not have water....Is it natural to say ''the boy is waterless''
Sep 3, 2019 2:21 PM
9
0
Answers · 9
You would not normally say 'the boy is waterless.' This sentence, constructed this way, means that one attribute of 'the boy' is that he does not contain water. Since the human body contains mostly water, the sentence is not normal. You could say: - The boy doesn't have any water. - The boy needs water. - The boy lacks water. - The boy wants water. - The boy is dehydrated.
September 3, 2019
The 10 miles of trail after you cross the stream is waterless. Make sure to fill up there. It’s a waterless method of cleaning clothes. You probably wouldn’t say “the boy doesn’t have water” either. The boy isn’t carrying water. The boy’s out of water. The boy didn’t bring water. Does anyone have water? I’m out. I have a little.
September 3, 2019
No Mehrdad, that would not be natural. A comment on how the boy is affected by not having water, such as “the boy is thirsty”, would be natural. If you want to be formal, you could say, “the boy lacks water”.
September 3, 2019
Thank you.
September 3, 2019
If the boy needs a drink, he is thirsty. If he really needs a drink, then a doctor might say he is dehydrated. If the community he lives in hasn't had any rain in a long time, then they are suffering a drought.
September 3, 2019
Show More
Mehrdad
Language Skills
English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Persian (Farsi), Russian, Spanish
Learning Language
English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Russian, Spanish