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Kai
English Word orders. Hi friends, I wonder if the sequence of English sentences will cause sentences to have a different meaning. For example like these A and B. A. In Chinese, if you intend to do something but end up not doing it, you need to use the word 原本 or 本来. B. If you intend to do something but end up not doing it, you need to use the word 原本 or 本来 in Chinese. Thanks in Advance.
Sep 9, 2019 9:04 AM
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Answers · 6
They mean the same thing, but the first one is clearer, because the reader knows you're talking about the Chinese language from the beginning. In the second sentence, the reader may be confused at first, because it looks like you're talking about what will happen if you intend to do something but don't do it, and then at the end of the sentence, the reader finds out that you're actually explaining something about language. In the context of a longer passage about Chinese grammar or vocabulary, both sentences are fine. But if this is the first sentence where you introduce the topic, it would be better to say "in Chinese" at the beginning, so that your subject is clear.
September 9, 2019
Both are fine :) I would use A over B though as it sounds better.
September 9, 2019
These mean pretty much the same thing.
September 9, 2019
Kai
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), Chinese (Cantonese), Chinese (Hokkien), English, Indonesian, Malay, Russian
Learning Language
Chinese (Cantonese), English, Indonesian, Malay, Russian