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saeiiiid
Is this sentence grammatically well-formed? Hello dear native speakers Is the following sentence well-formed? Both the students are Japanese. I know "both of the students" and "both students" are correct, but I want to know if I can remove "of" here and still keep the determiner "the" or not. Thanks
Sep 13, 2019 5:51 PM
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Answers · 13
Yes, you can remove the 'of'. It's fine to say 'both the students', just as it's fine to say 'both my parents'. What you can't do, however, is use 'wanna' in a normal sentence and expect anyone to take you seriously. Don't do it.
September 13, 2019
@saeiiiid - Teachers may disagree (due to regional differences, due to ...). You can answer your own questions with tools such as google ngrams.
September 13, 2019
Yes you can do it! "Both the students are Japanese." Is correct and sounds natural!
September 13, 2019
Yes you can do it! "Both the students are Japanese." Sounds really natural!
September 13, 2019
All of the variations are correct and natural. Both of the students. Both the students. Both students. (most common) Here is a google ngram of "both children," "both the children," and "both of the children," in the English Fiction corpus. The phrase "both children" is most common, then "both the children" is next, and "both of the children" is least common. https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=both+children%2Cboth+the+children%2Cboth+of+the+children&year_start=1800&year_end=2010&corpus=16&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cboth%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cboth%20the%20children%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cboth%20of%20the%20children%3B%2Cc0
September 13, 2019
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saeiiiid
Language Skills
English, Persian (Farsi)
Learning Language
English