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Julie
"the most passionate lover of sport" and "whose semons might be read much more than they are" ? Hello, How do you understand these: ""the most passionate lover of sport" and "whose semons might be read much more than they are" in this sentence: " But as, in the words of good Robert South (whose sermons might be read much more than they are), the most passionate lover of sport, if tied to follow his hawks and hounds every day of his life, would find the pursuit the greatest torment and calamity, and would fly to the mines and galleys for his recreation, so did this lofty and beautiful lady after a while become satiated with the constant iteration of what she had in its novelty enjoyed; and by an almost natural revulsion turned her regards absolutely netherward, socially speaking." It's from Thomas Hardy's The Marchioness of Stonehenge. The text is about a lady who has many suitors.
Sep 14, 2019 4:51 PM
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whose sermons might be read much more than they are: Here, Hardy is saying that South's sermons are very good, but few people read them. More people should read them. By using "might" instead of "should", he presents the possibility of more people reading them as an enticing possibility, and not a judgemental command. ""the most passionate lover of sport": Here, "sport" means "hunting". Hardy is saying that even the most fanatical hunter in the world would not want to hunt every day. Même l'homme le plus devotée a la chasse du monde ne voudrait pas poursuivre la chasse tous les jours.
September 14, 2019
Wow, that’s a difficult paragraph. The sermons bit means Robert South’s sermons should be read more than they are (i.e. because they are useful and worth reading) I’m not sure about the next bit
September 14, 2019
Julie
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