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meaning of yet in question and negative sentences Hi. I read a book and it says that meaning of yet is until now. And 'yet' shows that the speaker is expecting something to happen. But I confused when I try to understand the intention of a speaker. Has it stopped raining yet? -> Is the speaker expecting to rain outside? I wrote the letter, but I haven't mailed it yet. -> Is the speaker expecting to mail the letter soon? Thank you.
Sep 15, 2019 5:21 AM
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Answers · 5
Has it stopped raining yet? -The speaker is wondering if it has stopped raining. The speaker is expecting the rain to stop at some point, but doesn't know if that has happened yet. I wrote the letter, but I haven't mailed it yet. -Yes, the speaker is probably expecting to mail the letter soon. It has been written, but not mailed. The next expected step is that it would be mailed.
September 15, 2019
Has it stopped raining yet? -> Is the speaker expecting to rain outside? No. The speakers words indicate he was aware in the past it was raining, but is uncertain now. He wants an update - is it still raining or not. I wrote the letter, but I haven't mailed it yet. -> Is the speaker expecting to mail the letter soon? Not exactly. The speaker is expecting to mail it, but when in the future is unknown. It could be soon - the same day or tomorrow - but equally, he could be waiting for some event that may be some time away.
September 15, 2019
Yet implies something will probably happen in the future, but has not happened when the speaker is speaking. So, you are correct re: the letter example. Re: the rain example, we all know that when it rains, it will eventually stop. So, if it is still raining, one might say "It is yet to stop raining." Or, one might ask, "Has it stopped raining yet?" Or: "Has it stopped raining? "No, not yet."
September 15, 2019
HongJu
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English