Community Web Version Now Available
Ryan B.
"I thought I’d". Can I use this to talk about something that is yet to happen? For example: "What will you give your boyfriend as a christimas gift?" "I thought i'd give him a pair of shoes." Also, can I use it in second person? For Example: "What did you think you'd give your boyfriend as a christmas gift?" Another thing. When "I thoght I'd" is used, is the speaker talking about something that already happened? For example: "I thought I’d brush up my French before going to Paris." He means that before he went to Paris, he brushed up his French (He is talking about the past). or He decided to brush up his french before going to Paris (He is yet to go to Paris).
Sep 16, 2019 1:23 AM
5
0
Answers · 5
"I thought i'd give him a pair of shoes." <- that is fine, but as below suggests something has changed. "What did you think you'd give your boyfriend as a christmas gift?" <- That is OK, but possibly not what you meant. By using 'did' in the past, with the 'would' in 'you'd', you are asking what they _previously_ thought they will do in the future. By using past, you are suggesting they are no longer thinking that. Perhaps they are no longer going out with the boyfriend? Normally, you would just say "what do you think you will". When "I thoUght I'd" is used, is the speaker talking about something that already happened? For example: "I thought I’d brush up my French before going to Paris." He means that before he went to Paris, he brushed up his French (He is talking about the past). <- No He decided to brush up his french before going to Paris (He is yet to go to Paris). <- Yes What it means is that the _thinking_ is in the past, but what was being _thought about_ is in the future. AND there may be an implication by using past tense that they are no longer thinking about it. Last week I thought I'd brush up on my French before going to Paris next month. But I now realise I won't have any time.
September 16, 2019
You have used the contraction correctly in all instances! I’d means “I would” so it is not referring to something in the past but rather something that might happen in the future.
September 16, 2019
I would never say “brush up his French” which sounds completely wrong. I would always say “brush up on his French”. Perhaps there are regional variations.
September 16, 2019
"I thought I would" means "I am planning to." It does not refer to the past; it refers to the future IN RELATION TO THE TIME THE PERSON HAS THE THOUGHT, even if the thought took place in the past. So in the Christmas gift example, it means the person plans to give the boyfriend shoes. In the French example, the speaker is saying that, after he bought tickets to Paris, he made plans to brush up on his French. So it happened in the past, but describes a plan for the time after the thought happened. (Eg, If I am talking today about my trip last June, I might say, "I bought tickets in January and thought I'd brush up on my French, so I took a class in May and then spent June in Paris")
September 16, 2019
Those both sound Ok to me, as a native speaker. Initially I was going to say that the question ("What did you think ...") sounded _slightly_ strange to me, but the more I think about it, the less problematic it seems.
September 16, 2019
Ryan B.
Language Skills
English, Korean, Portuguese
Learning Language
English, Korean