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Mehrdad
"I like tea but not juice.". Or "I like tea but I don't like juice" or "I like tea but don't like .. Are all the three sentence correct? Which sound more formal?which is the natural one?
Sep 17, 2019 6:02 AM
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Answers · 6
The three are all ok and natural. Probably, the last - "I like tea but don't like juice" sounds the *most* natural to me if you are only making a general statement or observation. In casual conversation we tend to drop words where possible and here it's "I" (before don't). Keep in mind the three aren't completely interchangeable. If someone offered me a choice of only 'tea or juice', I would choose the one of the first two expressions. While the 3rd would work, it just doesn't sound as natural in this particular context.
September 17, 2019
The first two are valid expressions. The second sentence, "I like tea but I don't like juice" sounds less formal and more likely the way someone would say it. The third sentence, "I like tea but don't like juice" isn't correct; the personal pronoun is necessary before the verb ("don't like").
September 18, 2019
If I am talking about what I like to drink generally, I would not say "but" in those three sentences, as "liking juice" doesn't contradict with "liking tea". I like tea. I don't like juice. I like tea, but I don't like tea with milk.
September 18, 2019
Thank you.
September 17, 2019
The first two are valid expressions. The second sentence, "I like tea but I don't like juice" sounds less formal and more likely the way someone would say it. The third sentence, "I like tea but don't like juice" isn't correct; the personal pronoun is necessary before the verb ("don't like").
September 17, 2019
Mehrdad
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