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dolco
Why do we need 'the' in front of the grammar word? "the indefinite article" "the gerund" "the past participle" I've always thought that 'the' is placed when you're talking about something specific. But I see people usually say with 'the' even though you're discussing something general, such as "In English grammar, the past participle refers to an action that was started and completed entirely in the past." Why is that so?
2019年9月20日 18:47
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Answers · 2
"In English grammar, participles ....." "In English grammar, the past participle refers to an action that was started and completed entirely in the past." The past one of those - definite English grammar aspects confuse many. The gerund arises form a need and its syntax form older languages .... Which grammar aspect? The gerund? but you could also say "In English grammar, a past participle refers to an action that was started and completed entirely in the past." Here it means, not the general concept fo a past participle but any specific one, an example one. The definite article is difficult to explain. I'm not sure that it has derivable rules for every case. It may be that with enough use of "correct" cases, it just becomes natural. :)
2019年9月20日
This is because these grammar rules are, in fact, specific. There is only one tense called the 'past participle' so we must use 'the'. It's like saying "the English language". There are many languages, but there is only one English language. I hope this helps!
2019年9月20日
dolco
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English