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The meaning of "You can sing a song between the magician and the mime" https://streamable.com/81cdj This is a clip of a movie. I have three questions from this. 1. The guy with glasses hands out the talent show notice to the girl named CJ. They are best friends. And another guy who is her boyfriend says, "Yeah, do it, CJ. I mean, you can sing a song between the magician and the mime." What does he mean by this? Maybe he thinks talent shows generally don't allow singing but magic, mime or something like that only? 2. He also says "Let's hit it." as soon as the girl gives the paper back to her friend. What does 'it' refer to? 3. The dog [narrator] says "We were gonna roll in some stuff together." What does 'roll in some stuff' mean here? Is it idiomatic?
Sep 24, 2019 10:23 PM
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Answers · 9
Oops! I put my answer in the wrong place earlier. Good questions. These phrases are very much based in context and humor. 1. You're basically correct. The boyfriend thinks the talent show will only feature silly performances for kids, like magicians and mimes. Therefore he thinks it's stupid for her to go onstage there and sing. 2. "Let's hit it" is probably short for "Let's hit the road" or "let's go." 3. This is not idiomatic. The dog was probably just hoping to roll in some mud or dirt like dogs typically do.
September 24, 2019
1) The boyfriend seems to think that talent shows are stupid. (This is mostly clear from his tone of voice.) Mimes are generally regarded as annoying, so most people wouldn't want to be in a talent show that includes mimes. Magicians can be popular if they're really GOOD, but "talent shows" in general are known for often having a lot of very silly or bad performances. I think the boyfriend is simply mentioning a couple of juvenile-sounding but typical "talent show" acts to suggest to CJ that she shouldn't participate in this kind of event. He's saying that she'll be performing in the middle of a show with a lot of silly or "lame" performances. 2) This seems to be slang for "let's go" or "let's leave." (I've never personally heard anyone use "let's hit it" this way, but given the context, that's clearly what he means.) 3) No, it's not idiomatic. Dogs like to roll around in stuff on the ground, especially droppings left by other animals. The show writers are trying to say that the dog wants to roll around in something disgusting (as dogs usually do), but in order to make the line funny instead of disgusting, they're leaving it up to the audience to imagine what kind of "stuff" he probably wants to roll in.
September 24, 2019
The first one doesn’t seem to be a question of English, just lack of clarity of the movie and lines. For the second one, “let’s hit it” generally refers to going to do something. He may just mean let’s leave. Or it may be referring to something in context from the movie. The third one is probably just referring to dogs’ habit of sometimes rolling around in the dirt.
September 24, 2019
Good questions. These phrases are very much based in context and humor. 1. You're basically correct. The boyfriend thinks the talent show will only feature silly performances for kids, like magicians and mimes. Therefore he thinks it's stupid for her to go onstage there and sing. 2. "Let's hit it" is probably short for "Let's hit the road" or "let's go." 3. This is not idiomatic. The dog was probably just hoping to roll in some mud or dirt like dogs typically do.
September 24, 2019
Im a native born US citizen of 50 years and I have never heard anything like this in my life. It must be one "weird" movie. I had to watch the clip in order to understand any of it. Anyway, notice that the one guy does not like the other and he is a smart a**. The guy (named Trint) is making fun of her. The magician is a person and so is the mime. She can sing somewhere between their performances. The magicians turn, her turn, mimes turn.
September 24, 2019
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Language Skills
English, Japanese, Korean
Learning Language
English