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can these two sentences mean the same? "I don't talk with you because I enjoy it. I talk with you because I'm bored" "I talk with you not because I enjoy it. I talk with you because I'm bored"
Sep 25, 2019 10:25 AM
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Answers · 7
Yes they mean the same. Typically though if you use the “not because...” construction, you would include the second part in the same sentence. So I would make it: “I talk with you not because I enjoy it, but because I’m bored.” Especially because in your second case both sentences start the same and it sounds redundant. Your way does have a certain rhythm to it that you may want intentionally. And you may even want the redundancy for effect.
September 25, 2019
Yes they do mean the same. However, to make it correct it's better to say, "I don't talk TO you because I enjoy it. I talk TO you because I'm bored. " And for the second option, it would sound a little more natural, and with a better structure having both sentences in one, Example: "I talk to you not because I enjoy it, but because I'm bored." I hope it helps!
September 25, 2019
Thanks Gray🌹
September 26, 2019
Tim has given a good answer, and he and Hasmik are both right that your second example would sound better as a single sentence. Your phrase "talk with" is just fine. Some people prefer to say "talk to." (It may be that "talk with" is more popular in the US. I usually say "talk with," because to me, "talk with" sounds more like a description of two people talking equally, rather than just one person talking "to" another person.)
September 25, 2019
yes they mean the same
September 25, 2019
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