dolco
Is it true that [be+to+verb] actually is [be+PP+to+verb]? 1.You are to do your homework without watching any TV. 2.The plane is to take off at 9pm. I once saw that some other people said that be + to + verb actually sounds like be+[something]+to+verb, such as... 1.You are [supposed / required / asked / ...etc] to do your homework without watching any TV. 2.The plane is [going / expected / set / ...etc] to take off at 9pm. Of course, I'm fully understand that nothing should be in between 'be' and 'to' for the sake of conveying the formal vibe of the original [be+to+verb] phrase, but to me, a non-native, understanding this way, which is shown above, could be very useful in many ways. Also, I'm posting this because I'm not quite sure the people who said that are actually native speakers, so I wanted to confirm it clearly.
Oct 1, 2019 1:05 AM
Answers · 3
All of your examples are correct. (be + to + verb) is used in very formal situations. The announcement is to be broadcasted tomorrow evening. or The announcement will be broadcasted tomorrow evening. (be + infinitive) = hypothetical future
October 1, 2019
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dolco
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English