Hazem
Having never learnt here confuse me..is it reduced relative clause for (priest who)? As for optional celibacy, many priests are already in their forties and older, having never learnt how to form intimate relationships with members of the opposite sex. They would be ill-prepared to meet compatible life partners and ill-prepared for marriage.
Oct 12, 2019 4:47 PM
Answers · 6
"... having never learnt" is a present perfect particple. - simplified version Many priests have never learnt how to form intimate relationships with women. These priests are ill-prepared for marriage. - simplified version with a relative clause The priests who have never learnt how to form intimate relationships with women are ill-prepared for marriage. - simplified version with a present perfect participle Many priests, having never learnt how to form intimate relationships with women, are ill-prepared for marriage.
October 12, 2019
I think that it is an a appositive. And appositive is a phrase that adds additional information, usually between two commas. Example:”Many Americans, having never traveled outside the United States, have little understanding of other countries.” Appositive phrases normally come in the middle of a sentence. The appositive phrase in your sentence is unusual in that it comes at the end of the sentence.
October 12, 2019
Still haven’t found your answers?
Write down your questions and let the native speakers help you!
Hazem
Language Skills
Arabic, English
Learning Language
English