rook
Reported speech with to be What were the reasons of his dismissal => he asked what had been the reasons of his dismissal Was he joyful => he asked if he had been joyful ?
Nov 13, 2019 2:48 PM
Answers · 5
Did you write these exercises? They are convoluted, and not at all natural. Reasons FOR, not reasons of. Also why did you use 'what had been', rather that 'what were?'. In the second, who is asking? It's strange to ask yourself that...
November 13, 2019
Using Simple Past it would be "Was I happy?". Using Past Perfect it would be "Had I been happy?". Here are some useful links https://dictionary.cambridge.org/pt/gramatica/gramatica-britanica/past-perfect-simple-or-past-simple https://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/past-perfect.html
November 13, 2019
So how would you change the sentence :’ I was happy’ ?
November 13, 2019
The form had been was used here because the fact of being joyful or the fact of his dismissal had happend before the action of asking the question. We can use the form "had ...." if we are talking about two verbs or actions both of them happend in the past, but one of them happend before the other, so that means, the first one with "had ..." and the second one with normal past tense. I think this grammar isn't so common in streets but common in literature.
November 13, 2019
Both sentences are questions because the verb to be ("were"/"was") is placed before the subject ("the reasons"/"he"), you only should put a question mark at the end of the sentence. But there is a subtle difference between "he had been joyful" (Past Perfect) and "he was joyful"(Simple Past). It's also a little confusing for me. I've been searching on Google about the difference but in the end the best way to learn is to read a lot in order to put yourself with both forms in different contexts.
November 13, 2019
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rook
Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English