Kai
English Grammar Hi friends what are the differences between "want to"and "want" and when should I use one over the other? Here is some context. A. you can come to my home today if you want to. B. you can come to my home today if you want.
Nov 17, 2019 11:20 AM
Answers · 6
In that situation, both are fine. B would be grammatically correct but A is used frequently in colloquial English. Typically, “want to” is followed by a verb and “want” is followed by a noun. For example: I want to eat some chocolate. I want some chocolate.
November 17, 2019
Here are completely correct and completely natural versions. You can come to my home today if you want to come. You can come to my home today if you want to [come]. You can come to my home today if you want [to come]. You can come to my home today [if you want to come]. As for prepositions at the end of a sentence, they are common and correct in modern English. Here is an explanation from a reputable dictionary company. https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/prepositions-ending-a-sentence-with Moving the preposition into the middle of the sentence is sometimes done in TV shows, such as the Big Bang Theory, to make a character sound pretentious. At other times, the English word order is altered to make a character seem foreign (with incomplete mastery of the language), or archaic (such as pirate movies set in the 1600s). Normal: Here is the restaurant that I told you about. Odd: Here is the restaurant about which I told you.
November 17, 2019
Thank you
November 17, 2019
I am not a native speaker. But I think both of these two are acceptable. And Grammatically. the first one is incorrect . And I remember that Shelton have ever said, a sentence can not be ended with a prostitution.
November 17, 2019
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Kai
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Chinese (Mandarin), Chinese (Cantonese), Chinese (Hokkien), English, Indonesian, Malay, Russian
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Chinese (Cantonese), English, Indonesian, Malay, Russian