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How common is this usage? "Expressing certainty about the present or past We can use will to talk about the present - to say what we think is very probably or certainly the case. - ‘There's somebody at the door.’ ‘That’ll be the electrician. - Don’t phone them now - they'll be having dinner. Will have . . . can express similar ideas about the past. - As you will have noticed, there is a new secretary in the front office. - It's no use expecting Barry to turn up. He’ll have forgotten." (Ref: Practical English Usage by Michael Swan) ------------------------- From the usage above, how common is it in modern English? Is it old-fashioned British? If I want to express the same idea with a simpler structure, do these mean the same? - ‘There's somebody at the door.’ ‘That’s probably the electrician. - Don’t call them now - they're probably having dinner. - As you've probably noticed, there is a new secretary in the front office. - It's no use expecting Barry to turn up. He’s probably forgotten.
Aug 18, 2020 8:22 AM
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Answers · 1
The 2 alternatives you have given (with or without "will") are, in my experience, both equally common in UK English. It may be different elsewhere...
August 18, 2020
Toyger
Language Skills
English, Fur
Learning Language
English