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Anne
What does it mean by saying "Little more convincing is the argument that the shipowner controls the The context is: "Rix, J.’s view that this would undermine “the integrity of the bill as the key to a floating warehouse” is unconvincing, since the key concept was developed to protect merchants against insolvency, not fraud. Little more convincing is the argument that the shipowner controls the form of the bill, since even the most sophisticated bill is unlikely to be proof against forgery by a sufficiently determined fraudster." I am confused. Does it try to say the argument is not convincing or the argument is more convincing than the former one but still is not convincing enough? Thank you.
Aug 27, 2020 10:25 AM
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Answers · 3
It means that the second argument mentioned is only fractionally more convincing than the first. The main point, however, is that neither argument is convincing: in the writer's view, both are more or less equally unconvincing.
August 27, 2020
More convincing than the former one but still is not convincing enough It basically means "It's not much more convincing." It may be more convincing, but barely enough to make a difference.
August 27, 2020
Anne
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English