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Courtney
It's hard to understand ('which' in a phrase of 19th novel) the whole population of Parker's Falls, consisting of shopkeepers, mistresses of boarding-houses, factory-girls, mill-men and schoolboys, rushed into the street and kept up such a terrible loquacity as more than compensated for the silence of the cotton-machines, which refrained from their usual din out of respect to the deceased. In this paragraph, I'm confused whether 'which' is for [the people] or [the cotton-machines]? Because of the tense 'refrained', I thought it is for cotton-machines, (because if it's for [the people], isn't it correct that it has to be had refrained?!] but it starts to confuse me. 1) [The people] refrained from their(people's) usual din out of respect to the deceased. But they rushed into the street and kept up such as a terrible loquacity ...... 2) [The cotton-machines] refrained from their(machines') usual din out of respect to the deceased. But people rushed into the street and kept up such as a terrible loquacity ...... Which one is correct? Is there anybody could help me?
Aug 30, 2020 9:15 AM
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Answers · 4
The cotton machines. It is probably meant to be humorous, since of course the machines can't "refrain" on their own -- it's the operators of the machines who have stopped them (the machines).
August 30, 2020
The cotton machines.
August 30, 2020
Courtney
Language Skills
English, Italian, Korean
Learning Language
English, Italian