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Daniel Wang
how to expand my volcabulary ?Thx 4 ur answers
Dec 18, 2009 3:13 AM
8
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Answers · 8
Read more books.
December 18, 2009
I also side with Mark: using 'sms-ese' shortcuts like "thx 4 ur" can really limit and confuse your English. I've seen way too many students write "I wanna..." thinking it's correct written English. There's already a lot of good advice here, so I can only repeat: read as much as possible. You won't understand everything, so you have something to learn already. :) I really enjoy it when a book gives me a word I have never seen before. it reminds me that learning English is a constant journey for native speakers also. ^^
December 18, 2009
- Write sentences and essays which include new interesting vocabulary. This can help you improve both your speaking and writing skills. It also helps you remember the new words that you acquire. - Read as much as possible from a different variety of authentic reading materials (books, newspapers, magazines,etc). Every new book, short story or article you read teaches you new vocabulary, new ways to formulate sentences, and more natural ideas on how to use the English language. - Use a good English dictionary that can clearly define words, provide information about grammar and give sample sentences to show how words are used in context. - Make friends with natives. By paying a close attention to how they speak, you will learn idioms and the slang, the sayings they use and everyday English expressions. You can use the following books to extend and practice your vocabulary: - Collins Picture Dictionary for young learners (Andrew Wright) - Vocabulary Building 1-2-3-4 (vocabulary building workbook series by Betty Kirkpatrick MA) - Test Your Vocabulary 1-2-3-4-5 (a series of vocabulary practice books by Peter Watcyn-Jones) - Basic English usage (Michael Swan) - English Vocabulary in Use (Michael McCarthy & Felicity O'Dell)
December 18, 2009
In order to expand your English vocabulary you can follow 2 methods. First is the repetition-based method, where you learn English words by writing them several times or saying them repeatedly until you remember them all. If you patiently follow the process, you will see your vocabulary extended very well. Secondly, you also need have to have a notebook with your own note-taking rules. Each time you log onto Italki, note down any new words in the Questions and Answers section. The only problem is whether you want a rich vocabulary or not. Any good plan should answer the four following questions. Firstly, how many words will you learn a week: five, ten, fifteen or more? Secondly, when will you learn them? At a fixed time every other morning or anytime you feel like learning?This is what I personally recommend. Thirdly, how often will you review what you have learnt: once a week, once a month or before a test ? Finally, what areas of English will you focus on: sports, music, games or sciences? The answers may vary a great deal from one person to another depending on memory, schedules and interest. Otherwise, your study results won't be as you expected. You can gain a big vocabulary and improve your English by simply by determining what field of words to learn, making a plan of learning, choosing a learning method and regularly practising your plan and method. Although it is up to you, daily vocab learning is better than weekly and weekly is better than monthly.Good luck. I find that these 3 memorizing strategies work the best . * Associate. Use basic characteristics of memory to learn new material. * Visualize. Use mental imagery to support goals, rehearse skills and reinforce other techniques. * Verbalize. Use words and writing to learn faster.
December 18, 2009
4 1, lose the baby-talk, m8! Seriously. I'm currently trying to learn Japanese, which, as you know, puts much more emphasis on politeness than we do here in Western countries. Still, if you ask questions that contain terms like '4u', 'ur', 'm8', etc., you'll find that even Western adults have limits to what they find acceptible speech. Most adults I know find it annoying and childish even. We accept it from our kids, who apparently talk like in chat and such. And I occassionaly say 'Thx' too, or some such. But for grown-ups, in general, if you want to increase your chances of gettting a normal answer, please shy away from writing in baby-talk. P.S. I know you're probably just showing off a bit on your understanding of English slang. And a lot of non-native English speakers, yours truly included, all go thru a phase where they are (perhaps overly) keen on showing how many cool new colloquialisms they learnt. But, for instance, much like I know Japanese kids say a lot of 'wakannai' (which is pretty slangy for wakarannai, like 'dunno'), it doesn't mean I would actually use it on an adult. I guess there's a time and a place for everything. And if you know what's good 4u, try and ask questions in a grown-up manner.
December 18, 2009
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Daniel Wang
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), Chinese (Shanghainese), English, French, Japanese, Spanish
Learning Language
English, French, Japanese, Spanish