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Bulent
what does it mean " We often have people over to eat but sometimes we invite a lot of people over "
Dec 18, 2009 6:00 PM
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Answers · 5
Bulent ,is it a phrase you put together or did you read it somewhere.............it will help us giving you the right answer.
December 19, 2009
Hi Bulent, in this case, the first part of the sentence refers to a few people such a a couple or family. The second part of the sentence means they invite many people for a party or celebration.
December 19, 2009
Cherry, I think his grammar book, or some such, simply meant to contrast matters as follows: "We often have people over to eat, but sometimes we [just] invite a lot of people over."
December 19, 2009
Hello Bulent, "over" here means at one's place. They invite people to eat at their place. The usage of "but" here is not that adequate, since what comes after it doesn't really contrast with the previous statement" we often have people over". The first statement should include "few people" . There is also no need to repeat words like " people , over" twice. A sentence like the following would sound better and more consistent: " We often invite some ( few) people over to eat, but sometimes we invite a lot of them.
December 18, 2009
invite over Meaning: If you invite somebody over, you invite them to your home, usually for a meal. Synonym: ask over For example: invite over I’m inviting a few friends over for dinner on Saturday night. Would you like to come? invite over Let's invite some people over for lunch tomorrow?
December 18, 2009
Bulent
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