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Hailey
Know your way out I saw this line while looking over my dictation note. I don't remember which video this came from. Nor do I remember the context x_x What does this mean?I've tried to see the two of the videos I've watched, but I really don't know which was the one :( All I remember is that the speaker said this while having a debate with the listener.@May : Your answer helped me to get close to its meaning. Although I didn't remember the situation, I left this question because, at times native speakers' intuition is more informative than other things(e.g. dictionaries) Thank you, May! :) @Wozitoya : I'm going to use "know your way out" as you said "find your way out" is more common... That's who I am. After all, I understand how it's used in different situations. Thank you! :) @Mark Kramer : I got the nuance. But in "Do you know THE way out?" I don't see why "out" was used there. :( :( I understand the "out" of "Know your way out!". @My Language Tutor : Plain and simple, indeed. I wanted something more sophisticated though... I'm joking :) Thank you! @roi g : Thank you for clearing that up. I can see how to see it :) @romulus : Eurekaaaaaaaaaaaa!
Jan 4, 2010 3:06 PM
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Answers · 6
"Know your way out" in my own opnion its not only a physical matters but in some instance of solving some serious matter or if your in trouble... cowboy...
January 5, 2010
Find your way out is more common, I think the speaker replaced find with know. It is not a big deal, same meaning. 'Know your way out'- can be used to let someone know that they should be aware of the exits in a building so they will be able to leave quickly in an emergency. An example sentence of when this could be used is: 'in an emergency you should know your way out' - Quote from Ms. May It can be used for solution solving. Perhaps you have problem in dealing with the other italki members, they are fake and/or the great pretenders, and these people always give you the hard time. " know (find) your way out" that means you can find a solution on how to deal with them.
January 4, 2010
hi, just an additional input. I think the complete thought is : "you've got to know your way IN, and know your way OUT." this expression can both be of literal meaning and idiomatic. I can't think of other general example as most of them are already explained above. as to expressed as an idiom, it is somewhat related to this phrase: "if you start a fire, you should know how to put it out." :)
January 5, 2010
Unfortunately since you can't remember the context this phrase was used in I can't give you a definitive answer on what this term means. This is because this sentence can be interpreted differently depending on the situation it's used in.What I can do however is to give you the general interpretation of this sentence. 'Know your way out'- can be used to let someone know that they should be aware of the exits in a building so they will be able to leave quickly in an emergency. An example sentence of when this could be used is: 'in an emergency you should know your way out'. I'm sorry that I haven't been as clear as I would have liked to have been but if I don't know the exact context I can't give a clear-cut answer. Please let me know if you would like me to clarify on any point I've made so far ^_^
January 4, 2010
It most likely means "know where your exit is" or "know how to leave (a location)." Plain and simple.
January 4, 2010
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Hailey
Language Skills
English, Japanese, Korean
Learning Language
English, Japanese