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idrees
someone told me I have problem with Intonation while speaking...please explain and help me improve this.Thanks
Feb 7, 2010 5:47 AM
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Answers · 5
idrees, Here is a good article that explains English intonation: http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~krussll/138/sec3/inton.htm#english
February 8, 2010
hi, not unless we hear how you speak english, that's the only time we can tell if you really are saying it in the right tone or not. I'm not sure if you are imitating how an american or perhaps, british speaks english but the only way for you to master the right tone is none other than constant practicing. I kept on watching american films and tried to mimic their phrases all the time. As I was doing it, I was able to learn the right intonation of english words and phrases. As we both are non-native english speaker, I believe it's not that essential to be always at the right intonation when speaking english. But if you could, there's nothing wrong with that either. Let our tongue take its course. :)
February 7, 2010
I see now that you are Indian. I think my basic advice may be more beneficial to others as I expect that your English is probably pretty good. You might want to do some internet research of the particularities of Indian English as it compares with American or British English. Of course, Indian English is closer to British English not only in pronunciation but vocabulary. Usually, English speaking Indians have no problem being understood by Americans unless the Americans are just not used to hearing any kind of accent foreign to their own. www.youtube.com is a good resource for listening to and comparing different accents. Go to www.fonetics.org to hear different pronunciation and intonation of Indian English, American English, Irish English, Australian English etc. Janine AmericanEnglishCoach
December 2, 2012
oops! My comment was cut in half. Here's the rest. Intonation not only deals with stress and pitch, but also rhythm and timing and connecting/linking words and reductions. Here are some websites you can use to understand this better and to practice speaking aloud: www.pronuncian.com www.rachelenglish.com/videos/intonation-0 I'll end with this final bit of advice. Many English learners make the mistake of pronouncing each word separately. It doesn't help. It makes your English sound choppy or broken up and more difficult to follow. We native speakers usually pronounce a sentence as if it is one long word. We connect words by pronouncing the last sound of one word as the first sound of the next. Wake up sounds like way cup. Take Care sounds like tay care. We also reduce the sounds by saying gonna instead of going to or shoulda instead of should have. I don't know what country you are from, but your language is probably easier to learn than English. If I were queen of the world, I'd make Spanish the global language. It's a phonetic language without a lot of variation in pitch. Wouldn't it be sweet to learn a language that is pronounced the way it is written? Oh well, English is the international language for now, so I'm an English Instructor. If you want further help, I can be found on italki. Janine AmericanEnglishCoach
December 2, 2012
Intonation is actually more important that pronouncing every sound correctly. For example, stressing the wrong syllable in words can make you hard to understand or even change the meaning of the word. By stressing, I mean, raise the pitch of your voice (speak with a higher tone or note) and elongate the sound or sounds of the stressed word. (make it longer) You can also say the stressed word a little louder. Pronounce desert by stressing the second syllable and you are talking about a sweet to eat after a meal, like a piece of cake. Stress the first syllable and you are talking about a dry place like the Sahara, Gobi or Thar. Just by giving stress to different words in the same sentence, you can change the meaning. .Remember, say the stressed word longer, stronger and higher. 1. I didn't say he stole the money. Stress the word I. The sentence means that I wasn't the one who said it. 2. I didn't say he stole the money. Now stress didn't. Now the sentence may imply that I may have said something else or just simply that I DIDN"T make the statement. 3. I didn't say he stole the money. Stress the word say. I didn't SAY he stole the money. That wasn't what I said. 4. I didn't say he stole the money. Now stress he. Now it means that it wasn't he who stole the money, but maybe another guy, or maybe a woman. 5. I didn't say he stole the money. Stress stole. I didn't say he STOLE the money. He may have earned it or borrowed it. 6. I didn't say he stole the money. Stress the. I didn't say the stole THE money, the particular money we are both know we are talking about. 7. I didn't say he stole the money. Stress money. He may have stolen something other than money. This is a little hard to explain without you being able to hear me stress each word. Hopefully, you get the idea. If not, feel free to schedule a free trial lesson with me, AmericanEnglishCoach on italki.com Intonation not only deals with stress and pitch, but also rhythm and timing and
December 2, 2012
idrees
Language Skills
Arabic, English, French, Hindi
Learning Language
Arabic, English, French, Hindi