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Nikita
"don't have" or "have no" What the difference between "I don't have an ink in my printer." "I have no ink in my printer" and "I don't have an idea" "I have no idea" ? Which of them is a preferable?
Mar 4, 2010 8:02 PM
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Answers · 3
Nikita, Here are the positive and negative forms. I have ink in my printer. I don't have ink in my printer. or I have no ink in my printer. I have some ink in my printer. I don't have any ink in my printer. I have an ink cartridge in my printer. I don't have an ink cartridge in my printer. or I have no ink cartridge in my printer. The above also applies to (I have an idea.) with the exception that idea is a countable noun, so you can't say... I have idea. Your ESL grammar probably says that a negative sentence or a question using any verb except "to be" requires the auxiliary "do" in the simple present and the simple past. However, those of us who don't have to pass ESL tests can also use simple negation with the verb "to have". Ex. I haven't an idea. I haven't any idea.
March 5, 2010
Hello, I don't have any ... I have no .... None is preferable .You can use both. They represent different ways to say the same thing. The first one is negating a positive statement ( I don't have any...) ,while the second is affirming a negative one ( I have no ). In both cases they will give the same meaning.
March 4, 2010
They both mean the same thing, though you would probably use "any" "I don't have any ink in my printer.", "I don't have any idea." In the first case, "any" is used because ink, like water cannot be quantified. The second, with "idea" is just custom, more or less. In normal spoken English, you would most often hear "I don't have any..." rather than "I have no..." It has nothing to do with correctness, just day-to-day usage.
March 4, 2010
Nikita
Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English