Yang
What's the difference between "have got" and "got", especially in oral English? Thanks a lot! For example, He has got a beard, sunglasses. You got new legs? You got longer arms than me, man. I’ve got someone I want you to meet. We've got them boxed in. I got news for you, Michael I got Scofield right here. " have" or "has" sometimes could be omitted? I am confused about that. Thank you for your explaination.
Jun 8, 2010 12:24 AM
Answers · 5
Hi, Mike, thank you very much for explaination. if you need my help in learning or praticing Chinese, let me know. thanks a lot.
February 1, 2011
Hi, Mike, thank you very much for explaination. if you need my help in learning or praticing Chinese, let me know. thanks a lot.
February 1, 2011
In American usage, "I've got" is equivalent to "I have," meaning you possess something. This is informal but very common. If you want to say that you have received something, you say "I've gotten."
January 30, 2011
Right, in oral English have is usually omitted, however in formal writting, you can't use this term, I got it will mean you had it means you no longer have it now.
June 8, 2010
When you omit "have" you are still saying "have got", but "have" is understood. If you say, "I have got news for you", it is the same as saying "I got news for you". You can also say "I have news for you." "You have new legs." "We have them boxed in". Any of these ways are understandable to an English speaker. Hope that helps!
June 8, 2010
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Yang
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English
Learning Language
English