Teacher Beth
Professional Teacher
Can anyone tell me more about the 1st level JLPT? Who can tell me more about the first level JLPT test? I was thinking maybe I should take it one day, has anyone taken it, prepared anyone for it?. Is it both oral and writen? I have not been learning to write kanji, though I can read them. How many words roughly should I know before attempting it?O.k lol, my mistake it seems, I guess from James's awnser I actually mean 1- kyu....I just wrote first level as I meant the 1'st level, beginners, the easiest lol
Jun 8, 2010 10:43 AM
Answers · 3
Elizabeth, I'm confused about which paper you want to take. The system changed this year and there are now five papers in place of the old four, starting at N5 for the easiest, going up to N1 for the hardest. N5 is the equivalent of the old 4-kyu, and N1 is the equivalent of the 1-kyu. An extra paper was added this year because the gap between 3-kyu and 2-kyu was perceived to be too great (so the newly-added paper closes this gap). If you want to take the easiest paper, then you should take N5. This is very easy though. You only need to know about 100 kanji and about 800 words. The next level, N4 (equivalent to the old 3-kyu), requires around 300 kanji and 1500 words. I took 4-kyu in my first year in Japan and I failed, mainly because I did not know the structure of the exam and I failed to time my way through it properly (so I ended up leaving many questions unanswered). When I did 3-kyu two years later (a much more difficult paper), I learnt from the previous experience and passed it comfortably. I guess you mean you want to do one of the beginner's papers, rather than the hardest one, correct? You can get hold of books for the old 4-kyu/3kyu exams (previous year's papers, see below link), but from 2010 past papers will no longer be released. Therefore nobody really knows what to expect from the new papers (although they are not expected to be much different). If N5 (the old 4-kyu) looks too easy, I'd suggest jumping straight in at N4 (the old 3-kyu). Finally, you don't need to write any kanji, and there is no oral part. The exams are divided into three parts: reading, listening and grammar. It's all multiple choice. Email me if you have any more questions. http://www.amazon.co.uk/2007-Japanese-Language-Proficiency-Test/dp/4893586688/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276075668&sr=8-1
June 9, 2010
The official website provides quite good information as well as sample questions. http://www.jlpt.jp/e/about/new-jlpt.html Basically, everything is multiple choice; there is no writing test nor oral test. But there is listening test. Also, as you may see in the sample, you have to be able to recognize correct one among looks-similar-but-incorrect options. If you are taking N4 or N5 level, you have to wait until December. Good luck!
June 8, 2010
It's hard! ;) I have never taken 1-kyu nor ever will. I think the only way to truly reach that standard, for most westerners at least, is to live for an extended period in Japan. I lived there for 3 years but that was nowhere near enough. You will require almost native-speaker standard to pass that exam. I have passed 3-kyu and I will take the new N3 in December, followed by N2 next year (equivalent to 2-kyu). I think that's as far as my ability will allow me to go, especially as the leap from 2-kyu to 1-kyu is said to be enormous.
June 8, 2010
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Teacher Beth
Language Skills
Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), English, French, German
Learning Language
Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German