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Liza
Are there some idioms in English for the following situation: A offers his help to B. B feels embarrassed to load him. What polite phrase can he say to show his concern? A in order to reassure B sais something like that: "It's not difficult for me. I don't make particular effort to do it." Please, how could sound such dialogue in real English?
Jan 19, 2011 5:45 PM
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Answers · 5
1) I don't want to trouble you. 2) Piece of cake. No sweat.
January 19, 2011
In the case of Person A, Australians say "No worries" or "Not a problem" Example B. If you don't mind, can you give me a hand with this ? A. "No worries" , "Not a problem"
January 19, 2011
Well for the first part, when B feels embarrassed about bothering or troubling A, B might say something like: “I’m sorry to trouble you with this.” And then A, to reassure B, would say “No problem! It’s no trouble at all!”
January 19, 2011
From your description, Liza, it sounds like Person B would answer, "No sweat!" Meaning that he is not sweating by doing the job (it's easy, it is no trouble, etc.).
January 19, 2011
For the second part where you said " It's not difficult for me" you could say "it's not rocket science" or "it's not rocket surgery" (if you feel like making a joke) if you want to specifically talk about yourself you can use "for me" "it's not rocket science for me", or " it's not rocet surgery for me" Sorry but I cannot think of any idioms for the first part of your question
January 19, 2011
Liza
Language Skills
English, Russian
Learning Language
English