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Lucy
Could you explain the meaning of this word "the front end of the story"? Could you explain the meaning of this word "the front end of the story"? How people use this expression?
Jan 28, 2011 2:24 AM
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Answers · 14
It's bad English for "the beginning of the story".
January 28, 2011
The front end would refer to a book: the front cover. It is obviously at the beginning of the story. The end would be the back end. Maybe there's some joke in it too. What is the context?
January 28, 2011
Hey Lucy, I have never heard this before, so maybe it is not a commonly used expression. Sometimes we talk about the "background" of a story, which are all the implied parts that are not mentioned specifically (assumed knowledge). Let me know if you need more clarification. A.
January 28, 2011
Do you mean "the beginning of the story?" This expression usually means that there is more to tell about something. Sometimes, it implies that there is *very* much more to tell. Here's a common use of that expression in a dialogue: Mary: "I went shopping today, but I couldn't find the clothes I wanted." John: "Oh no! That's too bad." Mary: "That's only the beginning of the story! When I was going home, I was in a car accident!" It also literally means the beginning of a story (a book, usually). "At the beginning of the story, the princess was in the castle. At the end of the story, she lived with the prince."
January 28, 2011
I think it's background of the story
January 28, 2011
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Lucy
Language Skills
English, Korean
Learning Language
English