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why is "I am fit to bursting...."?not "I am fit to burst..."? (00:04)http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/i27kZA30L6M/ mispoken?
Feb 12, 2011 12:43 AM
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Answers · 25
"I'm fit to bursting with stories of my adventures." "Bursting" here means bursting-point. The "to" isn't part of an infinitive verb, but indicating a direction or point which she is heading towards. Should we read "fit" as a past participle, passive voice (fitted)? :)
February 12, 2011
No, it isn't misspoken. This example isn't a commonly used phrase, honestly. But the implication is that she is already 'bursting' with anticipation, therefore makes the statement more urgent. Does that help?
February 12, 2011
The answer is no "g", burst in. ____________________________________________________ Edit: Are you occupied? I'm fit to burst in as stories of my adventures. <<< So what's wrong with it? You're free to add anything after the "in": to burst in when I'm eating an apple to burst in and talk to you guys to burst in and give you a car to burst in if I'm crazy Anything, trust me.
February 12, 2011
Can you please tell me the exact name of the movie and when these lines come up in the timeline appr.? Thanks. I'll see if I can find the script, and even like that, I can't assure you the script is absolutely right. (Or do you have the subtitle? My computer can't run subs. ) Seriously, it doesn't matter at all what is after the "burst in", not at all. "In" is only related to "burst" here as its adverb. It is true that the very first sentence is not clearly said, I'm not sure about the "as", perhaps "with stories of...", they always invent weird accents to pretend to be Greeks and Romans, besides, be fit to doing doesn't sound that bad to people's ears, that's why they believe it's a gerund. God I don't understand you I'm trying to patch up your theory but you're just trying hard to prove it's a slip. If it was a misspeak why didn't the filmmakers just shoot it again? Just a close up for 2 sec. too obvious to be a goof.
February 12, 2011
Interesting, why not; and why not listen to the vid carefully again? "Burst in" perfectly equals to (<<< this "to" here is what I was talkin'bout) "burst".
February 12, 2011
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human
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