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Isaac.Pi
what are all the word endings and their purpose ? example 'wa,ga,no,'
Feb 25, 2011 1:47 AM
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February 25, 2011
about the particle " ga " , it's like wa to indicate the topic The difference is: If I say: Watashi wa Mark desu. It means that the information I want to highlight is after the "wa". If I say: Watashi ga Mark desu. It means the information I want to highlight is before the "ga". Here are two examples: If someone asks me "What is your name?" and if someone else asks "Who is Mark?" In English, the answer to both is "I am Mark". But in Japanese the answer to "What is your name?" is: Watashi wa Mark desu. Because "Mark" is the information I want to give. For the question: "Who is Mark?" for example when a teacher is asking a group of students, then I will answer: "Watashi ga Mark desu". Because "Mark" is already given, the unknown information is who. So in the answer, I want to highlight "I", therefore I use "ga" to indicate that is the information I want to focus on. look at these links to know the difference between the " wa " & " ga " http://japanese.about.com/library/weekly/aa051301a.htm http://nihongo.anthonet.com/difference-between-wa-and-ga/
February 25, 2011
Just as there are no possessive pronouns in Japanese, there also are no articles, such as "the", "a", or "an". no therefore is used to indicate a location or a position in a way that would require the use of "the" in English. tukue no ue [desk] [on] on (the) desk ki no ue [tree] [above] above (the) tree heya no naka [room] [in] in (the) room kuruma no usiro [car] [behind] behind (the) car yuubinkyoku no tonari [post office] [beside beside (the) post office ....................................... no is also used in a way that would require the objective case of a pronoun in English: kare no usiro behind him
February 25, 2011
Another common function of no is to indicate the possessive form of personal pronouns such as she, he, they, etc. In Japanese you don't have to learn separate possessive forms for pronouns. You just add no to a regular pronoun: watasi (I /female) ---> watasi no (my /female) boku (I /male) ---> boku no (my /male) kare (he) ---> kare no (his) kanojo (her) ---> kanojo no (hers) karera (they) ---> karera no (their) watasitati (we /female) ---> watasitachi no (our /female) bokutati (we /male) ---> bokutati no (our /male) anata (you) ---> anata no (your)
February 25, 2011
No = "no" is used to indicate that what comes before it in some way characterizes what comes after it. One of no 's most common functions is to indicate possession, in a manner similar to the use of the apostrophe in English: Tanaka-san no kuruma Mr./Ms. Tanaka's car But the range of the functions of no is much wider than just its simple possessive function. For example, it is also used to attribute one noun to another: Nihon no kuruma (a) Japanese car
February 25, 2011
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Isaac.Pi
Language Skills
English, Japanese, Russian, Spanish
Learning Language
Japanese, Russian