Jesús
What is the difference between finish and end? Why "end" in a film and "finish" in a race?
Mar 15, 2014 8:16 PM
Answers · 7
It is partly a matter of collocation - words which often go together. "Finish' also has the idea of completion which 'end' does not have. 'End' means something just stops, 'finished' is completed.
March 15, 2014
Hi, Jesús. The words are interchangeable enough that you would usually be perfectly understood using either finish or end. But for example, 'he will finish the race' sounds better than 'he will end the race' because ending the race makes it sound like he is quitting. In asking this question it is clear that you're making note of situational usages of words. That is great. Good job.
March 15, 2014
Each word has a different origin. At your level, you just have to accept that we say use each word in a certain way. Emma has given a fairly accurate answer.
March 15, 2014
There is a lot of overlap in how these words are used. In general, to finish something implies to complete it. To end something implies rather to terminate it, to bring it to an end. The assassin ended his life (just the opposite of completed here). The student finished his research. This implies that he accomplished what he set out to do. The student ended his research (for lack of funds). This is not a good outcome. There are other cases where the two are interchangable. The athlete ended/finished his career with 2 world records. In general think "complete" vs "terminate".
March 15, 2014
finish is a verb and end a noun. Because finish is a verb (action), it is something that has to be done so it cannot show up at the end of a movie. Example of finish: "I finished eating dinner" "I have to finish my work" Example of end: "December 31 is the end of the year" "I will have dinner after the meeting ends"
March 15, 2014
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Jesús
Language Skills
English, Spanish
Learning Language
English