Wu Ting
How would you interpret this phrase ‘the greater part of the entire country’? The beetles, however, are firmly settled on our middle Atlantic coast, where they chew up apples, peaches, grapes, roses, pasture grass and other useful or agreeable vegetable matter to the tune of $7,000,000 every year, and threaten to become rampant over the greater part of the entire country. How would you interpret this phrase ‘the greater part of the entire country’? Does it mean the whole country? Thanks!
Nov 25, 2014 12:29 PM
Answers · 4
:) I thought, "that doesn't sound like Barbara Kingsolver, he's moved on." When I Googled on this phrase, the first thing that came up was an actual page from Life Magazine from 1944. But then another hit showed me the place in "The Lacuna" where she is quoting it. I believe that in this context, "the country" does NOT mean a political entity, specifically the United States. I think it means "the country" in the sense of countryside, an area outside of cities or towns. I think it means "Japanese beetles have spread and now infest most of the middle Atlantic coast."
November 25, 2014
It's pretty simple, it just means "majority" or "most of" . For example: "The car has been broken down for a greater part of a year." means that the car has been broken down for most of a year. So, in your sentence, "the greater part of the entire country" just means "The majority of the country" or "Most of the country". This phrase is a little outdated and it would be rare to hear it actually spoken.
November 25, 2014
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Wu Ting
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, French
Learning Language
English