Vadim
What is the difference between the " I gonna " and "I am going to "? Thank you
Jul 8, 2015 7:20 PM
Answers · 6
Here we go, yet again.... 'Gonna' is not an abbreviation of 'going to'. 'Gonna' is not - I repeat NOT - an informal alternative to 'going to'. Nor does it have anything to do with slang. And it is NOT something that anyone chooses to say, or not to say, according to the situation. So what is 'gonna'? I'll tell you what it is, just like I, and the other teachers on this site, have told people what feels like a million times. 'Gonna' is a transcription of what it sounds like when native speakers say the two words 'going to' in fast and relaxed speech. It is not an actual word at all. It's just a sound. Nobody chooses to say it. It just happens naturally. Don't try to say 'gonna', because it just sounds unnatural when non-natives, who think that it is an independent single word, try to say it. Don't write it either. When you see it written, in song lyrics, slogans, cartoon dialogues and subtitles, it is simply an imitation of spoken language. If you don't believe this, look through the pages here and italki and you will see that it is only the non-natives who write 'gonna' (and 'wanna'). Native English speakers don't use this in normal written contexts, because it isn't actually a word.
July 8, 2015
there is no difference in meaning ... "I'm gonna" is a slang and when you say it fast "I'm going to" is formal English
July 8, 2015
'gonna' is colloquial English You can say "I'm gonna" instead of "I am going to", but only in a spoken context and an informal one at that.
July 8, 2015
'gonna' is informal. 'going to' is standard English when talking to your friends, you can say 'gonna' but never in formal situations.
July 8, 2015
Still haven’t found your answers?
Write down your questions and let the native speakers help you!
Vadim
Language Skills
Chinese (Mandarin), English, German, Russian, Ukrainian
Learning Language
Chinese (Mandarin), English, German