Mohamed
I am asking American and British natives, does (quite) different from American to British? I am asking American and British natives, does (quite) different from American to British? I have read in Cambridge dictionary that it means, it says. 1- NOT COMPLETELY (UK) a little or a lot but not completely I'm quite tired, but I'm happy to walk a little further. He's quite attractive but not what I'd call gorgeous. 2- VERY (US) very My sister and I are quite different.
Jul 11, 2015 9:41 AM
Answers · 8
You can use 'quite' in more than one context. Both of those contexts given make sense and are used in British English. I don't think there is a distinction between US and British English, although it would be nice if an American or a Canadian could confirm that.
July 11, 2015
You are "quite" right. Americans use it the same way.
July 11, 2015
Yes, that is 'quite' correct. There is a difference between the way that British and American English speakers use the word 'quite'. But it isn't 'quite' as simple as the explanation you give. The meaning number 2 in your definition is used in both the American AND British English. In British English, the word 'quite' can serve one of two functions, depending on whether it is modifying a gradeable or non-gradeable adjective. Gradeable adjectives are words like 'tired' or 'big' or 'small'. Non-gradeable adjectives are words like 'exhausted' or 'enormous' or 'tiny'. 1. He is quite tired = He is fairly tired/ He is a little bit tired This is an example of 'quite' used with a gradeable adjective. It softens the adjective, and means 'a little but not very'. 2. He is quite exhausted = He is totally exhausted/ He is absolutely exhausted. This is an example of 'quite' used with a gradeable adjective. It strengthens and emphasises the adjective. British English has both meanings of 'quite' : numbers 1 and 2. American English only uses meaning number 2.
July 12, 2015
It's the same in both.
July 11, 2015
Both meanings [1and 2] are used in UK English, depending on the context. 'quite a lot' means 'a lot' - 'quite' is added for emphasis 'quite a few' or 'a fair number' of something or some people means a substantial proportion of them : 'Quite a few people in the place speak English' It is not as many as 'most', but more than 'a few' I can't comment on American usage. UK use of this word is, as you can see, rather difficult to understand. Just keep your ears open for examples.
July 11, 2015
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Mohamed
Language Skills
Arabic, English
Learning Language
English